1/32 CAC Boomerang A46-217 “Hep Cat”

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby ericg » Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:10 pm

I always end up losing one or two parts from every kit I build, probably due to things being pretty hectic in my workshop with 2 of my 3 kids progressively occupying more space in there with the accompanying mess that kids invariably make added to the fact that I have lots going on in there in the first place. Sometimes the part is fairly easy to make and sometimes it is hard. A growing sense of dread within me started to grow however, when a full clean up of the work bench was carried out upon the absence of one of the kits main gear legs. Even an extended clean up of the surrounding area failed to locate it, so rather than blow any more time trying to find it, it set out to scratch build a new one. I had thought about doing both legs for a while anyway, as the kit legs are very SACish in that they are very be dable white metal and would likely be more trouble that they are worth. My hand was forced eventually when the axle of the remaining leg promptly broke off.

I wanted to be able to adjust the legs to be able to get the sit of the model right and not just copy the exact length of the kit part. This was going to require a bit of forward planning. The gear would be built up around a single solid brass core bent to shape, with the oleo being able to be adjusted on demand.

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I then made the top part of the gear leg from larger diameter brass tube, with the part that mounts into the wheel well made from solid brass rod drilled and then soldered perpendicular into the first piece. I then drilled a hole vertically through the new part that was the same diameter as the long brass gear leg as in the first pic.

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The two new legs. Notice how the top part is able to be adjusted up or down. I have drilled and soldered the axles for the wheels in place and used some plastic tube to hide the area between the curved part of the leg and the straight part.

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I used my RP tools ring make to make a small diameter ring of copper wire

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I fitted a larger diameter brass tube over the long rod. This part became the oleo and is the part that can be adjusted to give me the required length of each gear leg.

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The parts that make up each new leg.

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Assembled and test fitted. The leg can be pulled apart at this stage and the oleo lengthened or shortened once I am happy with it.

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Up on its new legs!

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Old and weak vs new and strong.

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby RAAFBrat » Thu Dec 27, 2018 4:22 pm

Amazing stuff. Way beyond me :D.
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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby Kahunaminor » Fri Dec 28, 2018 8:45 am

Have I used extraordinary talent yet?

Good old fashioned craftsmanship at its best. Thanks Eric.

Regards,
Kent in Oz
Bench: 1/48 Eduard Bf 109E-7, Libya, 1941; 1/32 Tamiya Spitfire Mk XVIe
Completed: 1/48 SH CAC CA12 Boomerang; 1/32 Eduard Bf109E-4; 1/48 Eduard Spitfire Mk IXc;1/32 Hasegawa Bf109G-6;1/48 Eduard Fw190A-8.
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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby ericg » Fri Dec 28, 2018 11:39 pm

Cheers guys, glad you are enjoying the build.

The cannons stick out quite a bit and I felt that they could do with some extra effort to make them a little less prone to breakage.

I drilled out the kit cannons, with a smaller hole drilled from both ends. This was done so that I didn’t have to ‘steer’ the thin drill bit over a long distance. Rather, the holes meet somewhat in the middle then I reamed out the resulting hole with a larger drill bit.

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The brass replacement barrel that I had made was slightly smaller than the hole that I had drilled and I didn’t have the next step up. I used one of my micro round files to enlarge the hole.

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The replacement barrel compared to the kit one. I have made it longer to the rear of the part. This certainly won’t snap off, that’s for sure.

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I then inserted a larger diameter brass tube into the leading edge of the wing. This is designed to accept the tube sticking out the back of the barrel as per my previous picture. They tightly fit together.

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The extra work that I am putting in here isn’t just going towards strength. Rather than glue the barrels on toward the end of the build and hope for the best alignment wise, I am using the larger diameter tubes in the wing to ensure that the barrels are aligned to the longitudinal axis of the model. I am not going quite as far as ensuring the correct harmonisation angles but also making sure that they point the same direction. By setting the angle of one in the wing (which I aligned with the longitudinal axis) I can align the other through the use of longer rods and making sure they visually line up.

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The larger diameter tube has been glued in the wing, cut and filed to smooth to the leading edge. There isnt much resin that it has been inserted into and could do with a bit more strength.

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I sometimes use this product when I need extra strength on a part. It is a very fine glass like powder that sets rock hard when it comes into contact with superglue. I poured some of this around the cavity behind the brass tube and then placed some drops of superglue into it.

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Now the barrels can be inserted into the wings and are exactly aligned and very strong. I will take them out until I am almost finished with the construction before putting them back in to blend the cannon fairings into the wing.

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby ericg » Sun Dec 30, 2018 12:06 am

Forgot to add the picture of the cannon barrel fitted into the brass tube in the leading edge. Makes it much easier to leave these off until the last minute knowing that they are going to fit really well.

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I don’t really have a shelf of doom, as long as nobody mentions my Hph Concorde. Some of my projects come perilously close to going there though, probably due to the non shake and bake nature of the projects I choose and the resulting ease of making an error. Similar to someone who reads a book and has to go back and re-read a whole chapter in order to understand a particularly difficult part of a novel, I find myself having to go and revisit old work, to start again to make things better. I had started fitting the flaps to the wings and came across a bit of a problem with how the fuselage and wings had been joined. When I originally fitted the wings to the fuselage, I needed to push them together with a bit of force. As a result of this, the inner section of the wing had a slightly concave shape when it needed to be flat. This was causing some issue with how the flaps were able to be fitted. I ended up breaking the model up to fix the problem and refit the wings with minimal pressure.

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I refitted the wings and felt much better about it although this caused a fair bit more work as some of the mating areas had been damaged during this extreme measure. This then led to another problem although to be honest this had been bugging me from the start and the following fix is well worth the effort for those building this model. The nicely done vac formed canopy is unfortunately very thin and does not lend well to handling and during the reassembling of the model, I put some pressure on it breaking it away from part of the fuselage. This was the second time it had happened and I didn’t want it to happen again, possibly at a far later stage of completion. The clear plastic does not adhere well to the super glue that I am using and joining it to resin parts does not give a good bond. The small elliptical fairings behind the pilot were also giving me some trouble so it was time for a comprehensive fix of their area.

First up, I made up some supports from plastic card that will stop the part from flexing and breaking away from the fuselage.

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I then traced the shape of the fairing onto some plastic card. A small flex of the vac formed part easily broke them away.

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I cut the part out of the plastic card, angling my blade so that it was beveled on the inside of the curve. I re attached the fairing and scraped away the paint around it where the plastic card part was going to fit.

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The re done part. The plastic parts that I added now lock the fairings down due to the previously mentioned bevel and also provide greater overall strength. It looks a little agricultural, but it won’t be seen.


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Meanwhile, behind me my young fellow is working away at his own workbench well past his bed time. Being brought up on a diet of model glue and Swedish death metal, what can go wrong?

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby Calum » Sun Dec 30, 2018 5:44 am

Some great craftsmanship there Eric. Enjoying watching this one progress
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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby DesTROYer » Sun Dec 30, 2018 10:39 am

Inspiring work mate. I'm loving watching you work. Thanks for the update.
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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby ericg » Mon Dec 31, 2018 9:32 pm

Cheers guys.

last session in the workshop for 2018.

Now that the majority of the construction has been completed, I can hold the model in my hands and look at it from different angles, compare it to photos and get an appreciation as to how it looks to the real thing. I have noticed a couple of areas that could do with a bit of a tidy up.

The top of the nose cowl ring is a little softly defined.

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I used a number 11 blade and a file followed by sandpaper to sharpen it up a bit according to my references. I also fixed up the top curve of it whilst I was there.

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I always felt that the bottom chin area of the nose was too straight and looked a little off.

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Ther area is a little more bulbous and was something I was keen to fix. The problem was that there was a number of different curves to blend in and wasn’t as simple as tacking a piece of plastic card on. I came up with a solution. Starting from the fulselage join I glued on strips of plastic card to roughly cover the area. Each strip follows the curve under it nicely.

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Filled with a super glue/talc mix, I sanded the area to shape using a coarse sanding stick and then smoothed it with with progressively finer grades of sandpaper.

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Primed to check progress

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I then used my JLC razor saw to hand cut the new panel line. I did this to avoid dragging a scriber through the different layers of filler and plastic. I went without anything to guide the blade as there are a number of curves to deal with and sometimes nothing beats the MK1 eyeball. The razor saw is very handy for sorting out panel lines.

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A small chip to deal with but very happy with the result.

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The new nose. A small but I think important difference.

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This pic is taken from roughly the same angle as the first one that I took of the unmodified nose.

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby pacificmustang » Tue Jan 01, 2019 8:57 pm

Can see that difference in the underside Eric, yes it makes a huge improvement. Nice work
Hope to catch you again in 2019, in fact I’ll be up your way in about 3 weeks

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Re: 1/32 CAC Boomerang

Postby ericg » Tue Jan 01, 2019 11:10 pm

Cheers mate. Let me know your movements and hope to catch up.


I like my models like my music; obscure, complex and full of metal! I have a lack of trust in resin wings due to seeing a couple of my kits wings sag over the years, in one case, a newly released resin kit lasted less than a year before the horizontal stabilisers started to droop which is a shame given the work that went into it. For that reason, most of my builds will feature some type of reinforcement of landing gear, wings and other structures to prevent it happening. It is also fun when travelling to go through security and look at the X-ray operators screen as my models pass through. Lots of thin metal metal rods passing through at odd angles, sometimes the outline of the model is visible, sometimes not. It looks like an X-ray of a bad accident fixed up and it is always interesting to see the operators face as they do a double-take at what is passing through, a change from the mundane iPads, headphones and rubber clad battery operated devices.

I drilled a hole through the fuselage where the horizontal stabilisers join to fit a brass rod.

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I removed the rod, and dry fitted a stab. This then allowed me to drill the corresponding hole at the exact location it needed to be from the opposite side to fit the rod into that part. I repeated the other side.

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The horizontal stabilisers now have a long piece of brass rod as spars.

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The elevators were fitted with brass pins to allow for easier placement when it came time to glue them into place. Using superglue, you only really get one chance to get the angle right, so this avoids any mess ups. I have posed these slightly drooped as per my reference pics.

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The rudder has also been pinned. Another benefit of doing it this way especially for control surfaces is that most of the strength of the join is in the pins rather than having to risk any glue being pushed out with a resulting visible bead, giving it a far more articulated look.

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