Black basing. First time

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Black basing. First time

Postby mogin » Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:27 pm

Hiya.
Im not the best modeller. Im possibly not the worst. Im extremely time poor so I don't get the kind of long run ups that some do when it comes to practice.

Consequently, Im always looking for quick ways to do things (within reason). One of the things I have struggled with is getting a realistic paint finish; one that is slightly uneven and exhibits some wear and accentuation, especially around panel lines.

I find preshading hard on the hand and struggle to make it look realistic. Then I heard about a technique called black basing which is basically the inverse of preshading. Basically you paint the whole thing black and then use white at low pressure (or whatever colour is reasonable)and paint a random marbling effect within each panel, spending less time on the panel lines. You then go over it with a fairly thinned top coat of your final colour to blend it all in.

This method cramps my hand significantly less than preshading. If your get your main colour mix/dilution right, its actually very hard to overdo.This is because the effect becomes stringer when the paint dries. So if you think you have overdone your top coat and killed the effect, just put it down and come back to it a bit later. You end up with not just panel line accentuations but variations in shading within the panel too. I would imagine that you could use other colours too for other effects. I personally thing I could have got away with putting more main colour on it but I didn't want to risk wrecking the marbling in the panels. I think next time I will take the marbling closer to the panel lines so the effect is more consistent and the panel lines are a bit less full-on. That being said, that sentence alone shows you the versatility of the effect and how much control it gives you over tonal variations.

Anyway, there it is. Sorry I didn't take any before and after pictures. I just got carried away.

Ben
Last edited by mogin on Sun Jun 21, 2015 9:19 pm, edited 4 times in total.
On Bench: 1/72 Revell B17. 1/48 Academmy F-22. Revell 1/32 Hawk. Hobby Boss A10 N/A. Academy 1/48 F-22. Tamiya 1/48 F-15J. The list goes on......
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby DesTROYer » Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:35 pm

Nice. I think this is the same as Post Shading.

Show us a pic of your finished product.
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby mogin » Sun Jun 21, 2015 8:38 pm

DesTROYer wrote:Nice. I think this is the same as Post Shading.

Show us a pic of your finished product.


I think post shading is shading that is applied after the main coat has gone down. Black basing renders the whole thing black and white prior to main coat with the hope that the black and white undercoat will attenuate the final result. Pics coming hang on....
On Bench: 1/72 Revell B17. 1/48 Academmy F-22. Revell 1/32 Hawk. Hobby Boss A10 N/A. Academy 1/48 F-22. Tamiya 1/48 F-15J. The list goes on......
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby mogin » Sun Jun 21, 2015 9:01 pm

Here you go Troy...

This is all WIP stuff. All I have got here is the main painting done. No panel line work (not that it will need much), exhaust, oil, blah. Just the main coat.

Image

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Image

Image
On Bench: 1/72 Revell B17. 1/48 Academmy F-22. Revell 1/32 Hawk. Hobby Boss A10 N/A. Academy 1/48 F-22. Tamiya 1/48 F-15J. The list goes on......
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby Zaggy » Tue Jun 23, 2015 3:51 am

I like Priming in Black - especially for Luftwaffe subjects. Uses a bit more colour and time, but as you can see on the A-10, its very easy to get a worn/worked look to the paint. In the case of Luftwaffe types, this is really useful. That said, I've never bothered to be so precise about leaving the panel lines noticable darker, choosing to let washes and weathering do the deed there; might try this in the future tho.

Can also be handy to Prime in a Dark Grey (like FS36081) for more modern stuff (like US Navy types) for similiar reasons - with the grey, you get a bit more a subtle effect and you can instantly begin to simulate repainted area's. Of course you still need to then go back and mix about 5 different shades of each colour if you're doing a gritty/touched up Tomcat or Hornet (one of the next projects will be a RAAF Hornet - looking fwd to painting that as there is a LOT of individual panels being repainted seemingly off the jet as well as on the jet, as opposed to the USN that seems to almost always respray on the jet.


Dan
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby DesTROYer » Tue Jun 23, 2015 6:37 am

Looks great.
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby mogin » Tue Jun 23, 2015 9:19 am

Thanks Troy, I put on a coat of future lastnight and it looks even better. Trouble is its very mat so I have to build up the future slowly.

Dan, yes I get what you are saying. If I was going to use this approach to mimic the respray effect, I would mask of areas with either a hard edge or a soft edge during the marbling process. I know it could be achieved after the final colour coat but this way seems to be much easier for me as it's more error tolerant. thanks for suggestion re luftwaffe planes.
Last edited by mogin on Tue Jun 23, 2015 1:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby Calum » Tue Jun 23, 2015 1:00 pm

Agreed, nice colour variation
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby mogin » Wed Jun 24, 2015 11:04 am

Thanks Calum, I got so carried away with it that I forgot to finish a couple of gaps and stuff. Anyway, I can live with it. I just need to slow down and think more before each major phase of the project. Thats one right there is probably a huge tip for any noobs reading this site.

In removing the wash I just scratched part of the wheel housing with my fingernail. Yay, go me.
On Bench: 1/72 Revell B17. 1/48 Academmy F-22. Revell 1/32 Hawk. Hobby Boss A10 N/A. Academy 1/48 F-22. Tamiya 1/48 F-15J. The list goes on......
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Re: Black basing. First time

Postby jvenables » Mon Jun 29, 2015 1:52 am

Black basing? Interesting technique that I never would have thought of... though I have followed Brett Green's advice regarding a base coat of black/very dark grey on small scale armour. I'll give this a go at some stage and see how it looks.

I generally model 1/72 scale aircraft and I have experimented with a few different "pre-shading" techniques. I feel that a black or dark grey pre-shading of panel lines is too much in my scale; in fact, I reckon it is too much in 1/48 scale too, but that's just my taste and opinion. The method I have adopted and have been happiest with is to simply pre-shade with the colour that I am using on that surface. For example, if I am finishing the upper surfaces of an aircraft in olive drab, I simply begin by spraying along the panel lines, around/over hinges and inspection plates, etc, in a reasonably thorough coat, and then infill the panels by spraying the olive drab as a very thin coat in short bursts. By misting on very dilute paint at very low pressure in short bursts, that "marbling" effect you mention comes naturally. This technique requires little or no extra effort and since it requires only one colour in one spraying session per surface (or per camo demarkation), it is probably considerably less effort and less mucking about than any other pre-shading method.

Early experience showed that when the job "felt" finished and was allowed to dry, the preshading inevitably looked overdone and unrealistic, so I now finish off with an overall misting of the entire surface to tone-down the effect.
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